Graphic Design and Animation Graduates 2012

Online portfolio and print on demand catalogs for Graphic Design and Animation graduates from the Department of Design 2012. On this page you will find our conference presentations, and by hovering over the menu groups on the left you can read contextual documents. You are welcome to attend our Grad Show, opening on 29 November 2012 at 6pm, and daily from 30 November to 6 December 9.30am – 4pm.

Alexis Prebble

Reboot to Play

An interactive package designed to encourage children outdoors through the use of a gamified campaign called reBoot.

The key contextual references in my work derived from the aim to help technology dependent parents to encourage children outdoors to play, through the use of a gamified reward system. Focusing on family communities, acknowledging the problem barriers and offering an alternative to the daily restrictions parents face. My work is specifically targeting those who struggle to keep their children occupied throughout the holiday periods and takes a creative and recreational approach. This focus in my work allows me to design the unprecedented ideas that gamification offers through the use of a structured process represented in the key visuals.

Original Concept

Original Concept

The idea of motivational play has been enhanced as a theoretical concept crossing with gamification throughout the structure of my project, with research demonstrating that nearly half of kiwi children are not playing everyday. The problem barriers (such as time restrictions, lack of inspiration and an abundance of technology) that parents face daily during school breaks, strongly influenced my decision to create something that was helpful and motivational for the children, especially those who were slightly more dependant on technology. The project leant towards a sort of package for child and parent, that keeps track of play and rewards it. One that contained a timetable, collection poster, medallions templates and a few other pieces.

“More than one in three children said they had no one to play with, one third said they ran out of ideas for play, and parents said children struggled to amuse themselves without electronic devices.”1

The quote above, pinpoints the struggles that children have come upon that I want to remove. Allowing me the chance to replace their struggles with a fun and productive way to play daily during the week, by themselves and with friends, while holding a focus on simplicity and clarity. Though not cutting out technology altogether. I have consequently established the key components found in gamification. The prospect of gamification has reoccurred as a theoretical idea throughout the development of my project, with research demonstrating that “…gamification can potentially be applied to almost anything to create fun and engaging experiences, converting users into players.”2 Each component of gamification, for example the reward system, allowed me to emphasize and simplify certain aspects of the design. The reward templates were designed with intricate designs and detail to resemble the old war hero medals.

War Hero Medallions

Circular templates were only complex to view when layered on top of each other, otherwise they were fairly simple in segregation. The theme of simple and complex, cooperating as one, reflects likewise to the audience of child and adult, joining forces in fun play.

Outlined Sections

Outlined Sections

Colour Reboot-ing

Colour Reboot-ing

Another reoccurring theme that impacted my research and design greatly was reflecting how the outdoors could be perceived as a positive space. The target demographic being young children, positive notions and elements needed to be associated with the project design in order to make it appealing. The target audience themselves selected the simplified colour code of the five medallions, being a variety of bright colours. These colours were used to symbolise the meaning of each achievement. Green was used to represent the outdoors, grass and trees. Cyan for the fresh air and sky. Magenta resembles the heart beat fast during exercise. Orange represents the sunshine and vitamin D. Purple is used to show the energy and creativity involved with teamwork. All of these bright colours, appealed to the eye of the target audience.

Isotype Designs

Pattern Designs for Medallions

The medallion colours became a uniform for the entire package. They are used as a selective ‘choose your kit colour’  aesthetic for the reboot campaign, as all children are different and should have some options when choosing the kit they received. In relation to the process of how the medallions were designed, with a variety of circles, stars, lines and rings that are all different sizes just like the children they are designed for. Each child is different, ranging from height and hair to cultures and communities. This correlates with the intention stated earlier for the package to reflect the fun and simplicity, with strong rationale.

Medallion Rewards in Design Process

Through the use of gamification, I was able to enhance to names of each reward with gaming terminology and link them with the associated colours and isotypes. The selected five achievements consisted of dialect commonly used in video games today: #1 New Area: Outdoors, #2 Obtained: Vitamin D, #3 New Boost: Fresh Air, #4 Enabled: Physical Activity and #5 New Invite: Team Work. Each isotype design corresponds with the respective achievement for the reboot promotion. An aspect of each isotype was incorporated into the design of the medallion through the patterns on the band, which singled out the main purpose of each action and creates a unique unity of colour and isotype.

‘Boost: Fresh Air’ Medallion Template Example

'Boost: Fresh Air' Medallion

‘Boost: Fresh Air’ Medallion

Wanting to further emphasise the interactive quality of the package with the audience, in regards to the terms of each design. The process involved pulling together the bright colours, interesting patterns and creative isotypes. Upon considering the card quality, it had to be distinctly lavish in order for the medallions to feel worthy of high achievement for the child. Not only does this represent a physical association with the achievement but also a mental one. The selected card stock was finalised as being a thick 180gsm weighted card called Silver Pearl. The same Silver Pearl, but in paper stock is used for the rest of the kit. The use of typography was to keep it simple and fun.

Milo Play Movement

Milo Play Movement

After considering the website design for Milo’s play movement, the chosen type had to be similar with the same friendly design in order to relate to the young audience. Careful consideration and trails went by before settling with Quicksand. A sans serif typeface that has rounded points and is perceived as child friendly. This also incorporates the use of the typeface Quicksand in the collection poster, booklet, timetable community poster. All of these pieces are packaged in a tube which can be used in some of the games like a bat which gives the packaging itself a playful, fun use that the child can enjoy. This idea came from playing tennis or baseball with the finished card tubes of paper towels and wrapping paper when I was younger. I have used these design elements involved in the style guide, to obtain a balance of unity within the package.

Collection Poster #Orange

Collection Poster #Orange

The reboot project uses a colourful, creative reward based system to communicate the importance of playing outdoors in the growth of a child between the ages of 7 and 9. The project tackles the problem barriers that parents face everyday and helps them understand how active play outdoors is crucial to a child’s mental and physical wellbeing. Instead of relying on technology and video gaming to keep children occupied and entertained, the reboot campaign encompasses key game qualities and gets children involved with active play outdoors.

Play Progress Poster #Green

Play Progress Poster #Green

The reasoning behind my decision to make the reboot package stems from personal childhood memories which involved climbing trees and playing with random household objects during the holiday breaks, even though we had the distractions of technology (not as advance as todays) we still played outdoors like kids should. We prospered from it, as should every generation. Reading Milo’s ‘The State of Play’ earlier this year prompted me to find an alternative for the children of today. The state of play expressed how important play is to both child and parent.

Laser Cut Templates

Laser Cut Templates

‘Active play is essential in helping children to develop physically, mentally and socially as well as being a fantastic opportunity to strengthen the bonds between child and parent. Play is also a fun and easy way to get kids physically active and enjoying the outdoors – great habits to form at an early age.’ 3

Final Daily Sticker Pack

Final Daily Sticker Pack

Final Sticker Five Packs

Final Sticker Five Packs

REBOOT Bonus Medallion

REBOOT Bonus Medallion

REBOOT Bonus Medallion Final

REBOOT Bonus Medallion Final

Having read this, I wanted to create something original and simple though with elaborate aspects,  reflecting child and parent cooperating as one. With a keen interest in expressing the importance of play outdoors as well as embracing and using reward systems used in popular video games, that appeal to the target demographic. Upon creating the reboot package I feel it is well suited to the needs of the audience and project. Expressing and clearly communicate that through the action and reward based campaign children and their parents themselves understand the importance of play and being outside.

Play Progress Timetable

Play Progress Timetable

REBOOT Final Tubes

REBOOT Final Tubes

REBOOT Final Display

REBOOT Final Display

1. Jones, Nicholas “Kids miss out on Vital Playtime” The New Zealand Herald. APN Holdings NZ Limited March 12, 2012. Web. April 23, 2012

2. N/A “Gamification is the concept of applying game-design thinking to non-game applications to make them more fun and engaging” Gamification. Unknown. June 11, 2012. Web. July 09, 2012.

3. Schofield, Grant “Milo: The Importance of Play” Milo Play Movement. Unknown. March, 2012. Web. April 17, 2012

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: